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Election Day Sermon: Rev. Elisha Williams

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By Dr. David W. Hall - Posted at This Day in Presbyterian History : “The Essential Rights and Liberties of Protestants” by Elisha Williams (Mar. 30, 1744) The great grandson of several New England families (John Cotton’s among them), Elisha Williams (1694–1755) graduated from Harvard in 1711. After a brief career of teaching and tutoring in 1722 he became the pastor of a congregational church in Wethersfield, Connecticut, prior to becoming and serving as the Yale rector from 1726-1739. His abilities as a scholar show why Yale was attracted to him, and his acumen shines through in this essay. After 1739, he ended his time at Yale, and some believed he was interested in serving in the Governor’s chair. After his Yale tenure, he served in the Connecticut legislature (1740-1749) and even temporarily as a Connecticut Supreme Court Judge—a pretty uncommon role for a pastor. A year before his death, he served in the Albany Congress with Benjamin Franklin to begin to plan for an America

Hon. Benjamin Harrison

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By Rev. David T. Myers - Posted at This Day in Presbyterian History : Due to Divine Providence Ruling Elder Benjamin Harrison was seen doing his normal elder duties that Lord’s Day on March 3, 1889, which was, collecting the morning tithes and offerings in the worship service of the First Presbyterian Church of Indianapolis, Indiana. However, this Christian Presbyterian was no normal elder. The next day, March 4, he would be inaugurated as the twenty-third President of the United States! Coming from a distinguished Virginia family, Benjamin Harrison was the grandson of William Henry Harrison, who was the ninth President of the United States. But William Henry Harrison was in office for just one month, dying on his 32nd day in office from pneumonia. Despite that brief term, the two Harrisons remain the only grand father – grandson relationship in our republic’s history. And adding to their heritage, an earlier ancestor of theirs, Benjamin Harrison V [1726-1791] was one of the signe

The Martyrdom Of George Wishart - 1 March 1546

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Posted at The Heidelblog : "On the sixteenth day of January, 1546, the Regent and cardinal arrived after night-fall at Elphingston Tower, in the neighbourhood of Ormiston, with five hundred men, and despatched the Earl of Bothwell to apprehend Wishart, holding themselves in readiness, if need were, to support him by force. As soon as the Reformer became aware of his errand, he cried out to Cockburn and his other friends, “Open the gates), the blessed will of my God be done.” The earl being admitted with some other gentlemen who accompanied him, Wishart addressed him thus: “I praise my God that so honourable a man as you, my lord, receives me this night in the presence of these noblemen, for now I am assured, that for your honour’s sake, you will suffer nothing to be done unto me contrary to the order of law. I am not ignorant that their law is nothing but corruption, and a cloak to shed the blood of the saints; but yet I less fear to die openly, than secretly to be murdered.”  …On

Hosea: The Drama of Salvation

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By Josias Grauman - Posted at The Master's Seminary : Imagine the courtroom. Imagine the joy. A wicked and guilty sinner is declared innocent by a righteous judge. How is this possible? By faith we the guilty are declared righteous through the substitutionary death of the Lamb. What a glorious thought. We are saved from God’s wrath! Yet however great that might sound, the book of Hosea demonstrates that salvation is far greater than this courtroom scene. Biblical salvation is not just a past spiritual declaration that makes a sinner righteous—it is an all-encompassing salvation, spiritual and physical, in which God makes sinners the objects of His everlasting affection. Hosea illustrates this salvation story. Read more...

How Scotland Lost Its Hold of the Bible

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By Iain H. Murray - Posted at The Banner of Truth : How Scotland Lost Its Hold of the Bible 1 was first published in The Banner of Truth magazine, No. 623-624 (Aug-Sep 2015). The article can be downloaded as a 28-page print-ready pdf here , and may be freely printed and distributed. Man is now thinking out a Bible for himself; framing a religion in harmony with the development of liberal thought; constructing a worship on the principles of taste and culture; shaping a god to suit the expanding aspirations of the age. … The extent of the mischief no one can calculate. A soul without faith, a church without faith, a nation without faith, a world without faith – what is to be their future? What is their present? When faith goes, all good things go. When unbelief comes in, all evil things follow. — Horatius Bonar. 2 There are times when Christians are conscious that a book has come to them just when it was specially needed. It was so with me one February day in 1954 when, as a