Our Life is Hid with Christ

Richard Sibbes (1577–1635)


Posted at This Day in Presbyterian History:

Excerpt from Vol. 5 of the Works of Richard Sibbes:

We are dead, and yet we have a life. A Christian is a strange person. He is both dead and alive, he is miserable and glorious. He consists of contraries. He is dead in regard of corruption and miseries, and such like, but he is alive in regard of his better part, and he grows two ways at once. It is a strange thing that a Christian does. He grows downwards and upwards at the same time; for as he dies in sin and misery, and natural death approaching, so he lives the life of grace, and grows more and more till he end in glory.

This life is said to be a hidden life, ‘It is hid with Christ in God.’

The life of a Christian, which is his glorious spiritual life, it is hid. Among other respects,

1. It is hid to the world, to worldly men, because a Christian is an unknown man to them. Because they know not the Father that begets, therefore they know not them that are begotten, as St. John says in 1 John 3:1. They know not the advancement of a Christian: he is raised into a higher rank than they. Therefore, as a beast knows not the things of a man, no more does a carnal man, in any excellency, know the things of the Spirit, ‘for they are spiritually discerne, 1 Cor. 2:14. Therefore it is a hidden life in the eyes of the world. A worldly man sees not this life in regard of the excellency. He passes scorns and contempts of it, of folly and the like. A Christian, in respect of his happy life, is a stranger here, and therefore he is willing to pass through the world, and to be used as a stranger.

Read more here.

Comments

Featured Posts:

Canons of Dordt: Divine Election and Reprobation

Canons of Dordt: The Perseverance of the Saints

Spurgeon's Top 4 New Year's Resolutions

Canons of Dordt: The Death of Christ and the Redemption of Men Thereby

Canons of Dordt: The Corruption of Man, His Conversion to God, and the Manner Thereof